Tuesday, April 27, 2021

What is different between Covishield and Covaxin


What is different between Covishield and Covaxin

Covishield vs Covaxin - Here is everything you need to know about Covishield vs Covaxin Efficacy, side effects, and more. Read ahead to find out.
Covishield vs Covaxin - As per Mohfw.gov.in

Covishield details

Intramuscular vaccine

Developer - Developed by the Oxford-AstraZeneca and manufactured by the Serum Institute of India (SII).

Vaccine type -
Prepared using the viral vector platform

Contains harmless chimpanzee adenovirus ' ChAdOx1 incapable of infecting the receiver

Teaches the immune system to prepare a defence mechanism against the active virus.

Similar technology has been used for developing a vaccine against Ebola

Doses required - Two-dose regimen

Efficacy - A good result of 81.3% efficacy rate, as per Medical News Today.


Price - Free in government hospitals and Rs 250 per dose for private hospitals and clinics.

Covishield side effects - Most common:

Pain or tenderness at the injection site
Headache
Tiredness
Muscle or joint aches
Fever
Chills
Nausea
Covaxin details

Intramuscular vaccine


Developer - Developed by Hyderabad-based Bharat Biotech International Ltd in association with the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) and the National Institute of Virology (NIV).


Vaccine Type -


Inactivated vaccine


Developed with Whole-Virion Inactivated Vero Cell-derived technology

Containing inactive viruses, Covaxin teaches the immune system to prepare a defence mechanism against the active virus.

Similar technology has been used for developing vaccines for various diseases like Seasonal influenza, Rabies, Polio and more.


Doses required - Two dose regimen


Efficacy - A good result of 80.6% efficacy rate, as per Medical News Today.


Price - Free in government hospitals and Rs 250 per dose for private hospitals and clinics.


Covaxin side effects - Most common:

Injection site pain or swelling or redness or itching
Stiffness in the upper arm
Weakness in injection arm
Body ache
Headache
Fever
Malaise
Weakness
Rashes
Nausea
Vomiting

A mortgage loan or simply mortgage (/ˈmɔːrɡɪdʒ/) is a loan used either by purchasers of real property to raise funds to buy real estate, or alternatively by existing property owners to raise funds for any purpose while putting a lien on the property being mortgaged. The loan is "secured" on the borrower's property through a process known as mortgage origination. This means that a legal mechanism is put into place which allows the lender to take possession and sell the secured property ("foreclosure" or "repossession") to pay off the loan in the event the borrower defaults on the loan or otherwise fails to abide by its terms. The word mortgage is derived from a Law French term used in Britain in the Middle Ages meaning "death pledge" and refers to the pledge ending (dying) when either the obligation is fulfilled or the property is taken through foreclosure.[1] A mortgage can also be described as "a borrower giving consideration in the form of a collateral for a benefit (loan)".
Mortgage borrowers can be individuals mortgaging their home or they can be businesses mortgaging commercial property (for example, their own business premises, residential property let to tenants, or an investment portfolio). The lender will typically be a financial institution, such as a bank, credit union or building society, depending on the country concerned, and the loan arrangements can be made either directly or indirectly through intermediaries. Features of mortgage loans such as the size of the loan, maturity of the loan, interest rate, method of paying off the loan, and other characteristics can vary considerably. The lender's rights over the secured property take priority over the borrower's other creditors, which means that if the borrower becomes bankrupt or insolvent, the other creditors will only be repaid the debts owed to them from a sale of the secured property if the mortgage lender is repaid in full first.


Important Link

Read full detail in Gujarati : 

In many jurisdictions, it is normal for home purchases to be funded by a mortgage loan. Few individuals have enough savings or liquid funds to enable them to purchase property outright. In countries where the demand for home ownership is highest, strong domestic markets for mortgages have developed. Mortgages can either be funded through the banking sector (that is, through short-term deposits) or through the capital markets through a process called "securitization", which converts pools of mortgages into fungible bonds that can be sold to investors in small denominations
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